#Good news! The IRS has extended the tax deadline to April 18th! As long as you submit your federal return by midnight on 4/18/2018, you won't be considered a late filer for your federal return. Direct debit tax payments that are submitted with your federal return (or on the IRS website) by 4/18 are also considered timely filed ×

What if I received a W-2 with wrong information from my employer?

I was about to start entering my information, but noticed a printed mistake on my W-2. What should I do?
Reach out to your employer as soon as possible. Let them know about the mistake you’ve found and ask if your employer can provide a corrected W-2, also known as the W-2C. The form will look a little different compared to your original W-2 as it’s split into two sections: previously reported and correct information. Enter the values shown in the correct information section and be sure to double check the numbers before filing your return.

For a reference of how the W-2C looks like, please visit this IRS link.

What if I’m having trouble getting in touch with my employer?
If it’s already near the end of February, but you haven’t heard back from your employer yet, contact the IRS directly to let an IRS agent know about the outdated W-2. The IRS will try to contact the employer by mail to request for a corrected W-2 on your behalf. You can contact an IRS agent by calling in at 800-829-1040 or through an IRS Taxpayer Assistance Center by appointment.

To plan ahead for your phone call, have these following pieces of information on hand:
Your name, full mailing address, phone number, and social security number
Your employer’s name, full mailing address, and phone number
If possible, your employer’s identification number (EIN)

If the IRS is unable to get a response from my employer, do I still file my W-2 even though I know it’s wrong?
You can still file your taxes with us, even if you don’t have a W-2. IRS will send you Form 4852, which serves as substitute for a W-2 and W-2C if the IRS can’t contact your employer either. You can use this form if your employer doesn’t give you your W-2C before the filing deadline. Instructions should be enclosed with the form, so read through it carefully. The IRS recommends you make your best estimate when completing Form 4852 with the help of your final paycheck or pay stub from the tax year from the employer.

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