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ID Monitoring FAQ

Where does this information come from?

Can I search for someone else?

Why is my information associated with a website or service I’ve never been to?

What can I do? What’s my next step?

Should I change my Credit Karma password?

My information wasn’t found. Is my personal information safe?

What does this mean for the security of my Credit Karma account?

Why is Credit Karma doing this?


Where does this information come from?

All of this information comes from personal data that’s been accessed by unknown individuals that was gathered from the internet, and then accessed without authorization and made public. We created one easily searchable place that will tell you if your information was part of a data breach.


Can I search for someone else?

In order to see if someone else's information has been exposed online, you’ll need to know their email address. Credit Karma’s ID Monitoring service is designed to make it easier for our members to figure out if and when their information been exposed online, and how to fix it. You won’t be able to see the personal information itself, only that it has been exposed. So feel free to search for your friends and let them know if their information has been breached.


Why is my information associated with a website or service I’ve never been to?

When you search for an email address, you may notice that your information is associated with a website or service that you don’t recall visiting or signing up for. There are many possible reasons for this:

Your data was either sold or redistributed: It’s typical for many websites to buy data from other companies and redistribute it. From here there are two basic ways to explain why your information is associated with a website or service you never visited or registered for - either your information was shared with your permission (which you gave by accepting their privacy policy), or your information was accessed by someone without your permission. There is a third way, and it’s a bit trickier, but it essentially entails both ways listed above in that your information was shared with your permission by one website (that you registered for or visited) with another (that you did not), and then was accessed without your permission or the permission of either website.

Other people can sign you up: People often “fat finger” (i.e., mistype) their email address when signing up for an online service. It’s possible that your email address was entered by mistake.

You forgot you signed up: Most of us leave a large trail of accounts that we’ve signed up for over the years. It’s possible that you may have signed up for a service and forgotten about it as time goes by.

Websites often rename/rebrand or merge with other websites: While it’s pretty rare that this would lead to the exposure of your personal information, it is a possibility. Companies are constantly adjusting their branding strategies, and companies buy or merge with other companies all the time. Long story short, when a company changes names or is acquired by another company, they may still retain all the same information they collected beforehand.


What can I do? What’s my next step?

The next step depends on what kind of information was exposed online. For example, you’re going to want to make a different decision if your email address and password were exposed versus your Social Security number or driver's license. We provide information on our site about what to do next for most scenarios.


Should I change my Credit Karma password?

You can change your Credit Karma password whenever you like, especially if you're worried about the safety of your financial information. To change your password click here.


My information wasn’t found. Is my personal information safe?

We strive like to keep all of ID Monitoring information up to date, but it is possible that we missed something or we don’t yet know about the breach. We’re expanding and improving this service all the time, so if you don’t see any information now, check back soon to see if there have been any updates.


What does this mean for the security of my Credit Karma account?

An ID Monitoring result showing that your information has been exposed online does not necessarily mean that the information from your Credit Karma account has been exposed. Keep in mind, though, that reusing your password once you’ve confirmed your information has been exposed does make it easier for unauthorized users to access your account. If we identify suspicious activity on your Credit Karma account, we will notify you by e-mail. We take your security and privacy very seriously, which is why we use 128-bit encryption methods and firewalls to protect your personal information. Our data centers are monitored around the clock, and we enlist third-party experts in the field of application security to assess our site for vulnerabilities. They also confirm and validate the security of our site. We go the extra mile to make sure your personal information is safe and secure.

 

Why is Credit Karma doing this?

Credit Karma is all about helping you make real, meaningful financial progress, and helping you with your personal/financial information security is a big part of that. We do what we can to help out.

Still have questions? Contact us.
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